Sex Offender Registry Requirements Across the United States

What is the Sex Offender Registry?

Every state and U.S. territory requires those convicted of sex offenses to be added to a registry to be monitored and tracked after their release back into the community.  Information about the offender is collected and shared with local and federal authorities, as well as the general public.  Requirements and restrictions are often placed on registered sex offenders.  That registration process is unique in each state and U.S. territory.

Reentry (2)

What is SORNA?

The Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA) was passed in 2006 as part of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act to provide federal standards for jurisdictions to follow.  SORNA calls for states and U.S. territories to meet minimum requirements for sex offender registration and notification.

Why Are the Requirements for Sex Offender Registration Different Everywhere?

While SORNA’s guidelines streamlined registration and notification requirements across the country, these requirements are far from uniform.  Each jurisdiction determines the details of their own registration process.  This leaves a patchwork of rules for sex offenders that vary widely depending on where a registrant lives or works.

Where PIN Comes In

Probation Information Network developed a list of questions regarding the sex offender registration requirements across the country.  These are questions that might concern the public, victims and their advocates, or those who are facing registration or are currently registered and their loved ones.  We then searched the statutes or code of each jurisdiction for the laws surrounding sex offender registration and notification.  Where necessary, we consulted with the law enforcement agency in charge of the jurisdiction’s registry to provide clear and concise answers to the following questions:

 

    • What is the duration of registration?

How long must a sex offender remain on the registry?  The length of time a sex offender must comply with registration requirements varies widely depending on the jurisdiction where the registrant lives, and the level of the offense committed.  All but 2 jurisdictions offer a path for eventual removal from the registry for at least some of their registrants.

 

    • Must the immediate community be notified directly, either by the offender or law enforcement?

Every jurisdiction has passive community notification in the form of a public sex offender registry website.  Concerned citizens are free to search the website and can sign up for email notifications if a sex offender moves into their neighborhood.  Some jurisdictions go even further and require active notification, where either law enforcement or the offender themselves is required to directly notify the immediate community that a sex offender is in the area.  This can take many forms, including electronic, mail, or in-person notification, publication in local newspapers, and community meetings.

 

    • What are the residence distance restrictions?

Are there any restrictions on where a registered sex offender can live?  Some jurisdictions restrict registrants from living within a measured distance of certain places.  This restriction could be for all registrants, or only for higher-level offenders or those under supervision.  Some jurisdictions do not have a state-wide restriction but do allow local jurisdictions to enact their own.

 

    • What are the employment distance restrictions?

Registered sex offenders are usually restricted from certain types of employment, and from working at establishments that specifically cater to minors.  Some jurisdictions go even further and restrict registrants from working within a measured distance of certain places.

 

    • Is an employer’s information included on the public registry?

Returning citizens of every type need to find employment upon reentry, and sex offenders are no exception.  Some jurisdictions include registrants’ employment information on the public registry website.  This could be the employer’s address or in some cases the name of the employer.

 

    • Are online identifiers included on the public registry?

Some jurisdictions require registered sex offenders to report any identifiers they use online, such as email addresses and social media user names.  In some jurisdictions that information is included on the public registry website, separate from the registrant’s profile, in a feature that allows the pubic to search by specific identifiers.

 

    • Is a state-issued ID required to be labeled?

Some jurisdictions require a state-issued ID, such as a driver’s license, to be labeled to identify the holder as a registered sex offender.  This label could be the words “Sex Offender” printed on the ID in a prominent place or a more subtle designation known to law enforcement.

 

    • What is the cost of registration?

Is there a fee to register as a sex offender?  Some jurisdictions pass on some of their administrative costs to the registrants.  This could be a one-time fee paid only upon initial registration, or an ongoing fee paid annually or quarterly.  Some jurisdictions charge a fee every time a registrant updates their information.

 

    • How long can a registrant be in the state for work or education before registration is required?

Does a sex offender have to register if they work or go to school in a different state?  It depends on the state, and how long the registrant will be there.  Some jurisdictions require registrants to notify authorities immediately, while others allow limited stays without requiring registration.  Registrants currently under supervision usually need permission from their Parole or Probation Officer before traveling and should always consult their supervising officer.

 

    • How long can a registrant visit the state before registration is required?

Can a registered sex offender go on vacation?  Does a sex offender have to register if they visit a different state?  It depends on the state, and how long the registrant will be there.  Some jurisdictions require registrants to notify authorities immediately, while others allow limited stays without requiring registration.  Registrants currently under supervision usually need permission from their Parole or Probation Officer before traveling and should always consult their supervising officer.

 

The answers provided are taken directly from the laws found on the state or territory’s legislative website or, where necessary, from the website of the law enforcement agency in charge of the jurisdiction’s registry.  In some cases, we contacted state or territory officials for clarification and have directly quoted those conversations.

Disclaimer

While we stand by our research, it is for informational purposes only.  It should not be considered legal advice and, while we strive to provide accurate and up to date information, it is not guaranteed to be complete or correct.  We provide links to each jurisdiction’s legislative and law enforcement websites and maintain a directory of lawyers who specialize in sex offender registration laws.  For those currently under supervision, consult with your Parole or Probation Officer for guidance.

How long can a registrant visit the state before registration is required?

Can a registered sex offender go on vacation?  Does a sex offender have to register if they visit a different state?  It depends on the state, and how long the registrant will be there.  Some jurisdictions require registrants to notify authorities immediately, while others allow limited stays without requiring registration.  Registrants currently under supervision usually need permission from their Parole or Probation Officer before traveling and should always consult their supervising officer.

Out of State Visitation Limits Map

27 states and territories require registration for visits of less than 7 days.

This comparison chart is intended to be a quick reference guide to compare the sex offender registry requirements across jurisdictions.  It does not provide enough details for a full and accurate picture and should not be used by itself, but rather as a tool alongside the full-text versions.

StateHow long can a registrant visit the state before registration is required? You must register...
AlabamaIf present for 30 days
AlaskaWithin 3 days of arrival
ArizonaWithin 10 days of arrival
ArkansasIf present for aggregate of 5 or more consecutive days during a cal. year
CaliforniaWithin 5 working days, but contact law enforcement for local rules
ColoradoWithin 5 business days if stay exceeds 14 consecutive business days or more than 30 days in a cal. year
ConnecticutFor visits less than 5 days: notify but info for internal law enforcement use only; for visits 5 days or longer: full in-person registration
DelawareWithin 3 business days if stay exceeds 7 consecutive days or more than 30 days in a cal. year
FloridaWithin 3 consecutive days or more than 3 days in the cal. year
GeorgiaIf present more than 14 consecutive days or more than 30 days in a cal. year
HawaiiWithin 3 working days of arrival if stay exceeds 10 days or more than 30 days in a cal. year
IdahoWithin 2 working days
IllinoisIf present for more than 3 days in a cal. year
IndianaIf present 7 days (including part of a day) during a 180 day period
IowaWithin 5 business days
KansasWithin 3 business days
KentuckyWithin 5 working days if stay exceeds 14 days or more than 30 days in a cal. year
LouisianaWithin 3 business days
MaineNotify law enforcement within 24 hours; notify registry within 5 days for Pre-2013 or 3 days for Post-2013; fully register if stay is 14 consecutive days or more than 30 days in a cal. year
MarylandWithin 3 days
MassachusettsWithin 2 days
MichiganNot more than 3 business days after arrival
MinnesotaIf present for 14 days or longer or for more than 30 days in a cal. year
MississippiIf present for 7 or more consecutive days
MissouriIf present for more than 7 days in a 12-month period
MontanaWithin 3 business days if stay exceeds 10 days or more than 30 days in a cal. year
NebraskaWithin 3 working days
NevadaNot later than 48 hours after arriving
New HampshireWithin 5 business days
New JerseyWithin 10 days
New MexicoIf convicted after July 1, 2013, within 5 days; if convicted prior to July 1, 2013, if present for more than 10 days
New YorkIf present for 14 consecutive days or 30 days in a 12-month period
North CarolinaIf present for 15 days
North DakotaWithin 3 days if stay exceeds 10 days or more than 30 days in a cal. year
OhioIf offense before Jan. 1, 2008, within 5 days; if offense on or after Jan. 1, 2008, within 3 days
OklahomaWithin 3 days if present 7 consecutive days or 14 days in a 60-day period. If spouse lives in state: within 2 days if present 5 consecutive days or in a cal. year.
OregonVisitors to Oregon are not required to register
PennsylvaniaWithin 3 business days if present for 30 consecutive days or more in a cal. year
Rhode IslandWithin 24 hours
South CarolinaWithin 3 business days of establishing residence; residence defined as 10 or more consecutive days
South DakotaWithin 3 business days
TennesseeWithin 48 hours; defined as a continuous 48 hour period, not including Sat, Sun or federal or state holidays
TexasWithin 7 days
UtahIf present 10 or more days in a 12-month period
VermontWithin 10 days if present for 10 consecutive days or 30 days in a cal. year
VirginiaWithin 3 days if present for 30 days or more
WashingtonWithin 3 business days if present 10 days or more
West VirginiaIf present more than 15 continuous days
WisconsinWithin 10 days
WyomingWithin 3 business days
Washington DCIf present for more than 30 days
GuamWithin 3 working days
NMIWithin 3 business days
Puerto RicoNo later than 3 days after arrival
US Virgin IslandsWithin 3 business days of arrival

Alabama

No registration requirement unless one intends to establish residence.  *Residency can be considered established if one remains in a state for 30 days.

Alaska

Registered sex offenders from other jurisdictions who travel to Alaska are required to notify the Alaska Sex Offender Registry office of their presence in the state.  For visits of less than 30 days, [a] temporary presence report completes notification.

This report must be submitted before the visit or within three days of arriving in Alaska.

– Alaska Department of Public Safety

Arizona

A.R.S. § 13-3821.

A. A person who has been convicted of or adjudicated guilty except insane for a violation or attempted violation of any of the following offenses or who has been convicted of or adjudicated guilty except insane or not guilty by reason of insanity for an offense committed in another jurisdiction that if committed in this state would be a violation or attempted violation of any of the following offenses or an offense that was in effect before September 1, 1978 and that, if committed on or after September 1, 1978, has the same elements of an offense listed in this section or who is required to register by the convicting or adjudicating jurisdiction, within ten days after the conviction or adjudication or within ten days after entering and remaining in any county of this state, shall register with the sheriff of that county.

Arkansas

AR Code § 12-12-903

(10)(A) “Residency” means the place where a person lives notwithstanding that there may be an intent to move or return at some future date to another place.

(10)(B) “Residency” also includes:

(i) A place of employment;

(ii) A place of training;

(iii) A place of education; or

(iv) A temporary residence or domicile in which a person resides for an aggregate of five (5) or more consecutive days during a calendar year;

California

Currently, California Penal Code section 290 requires a registrant who is residing in one location for more than five (5) working days to register with the law enforcement agency (Police or Sheriff Department) having jurisdiction over his/her location.

Unfortunately, under existing law it has not been determined whether a person on vacation or visiting is actually “residing” in a temporary location while in our state.  As a result, it is at the discretion of law enforcement to decide when a person vacationing or visiting on a temporary basis must register in their jurisdiction.  Therefore, we suggest you contact the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction over the California location you intend to visit.  The local law enforcement agency can address any questions you may have concerning your visit to their area.

– Office of the Attorney General, California Department of Justice

Colorado

CO Rev Stat § 16-22-102

(8) “Temporary resident” means a person who is a resident of another state but in Colorado temporarily because the person is:

(c) Present in Colorado for more than fourteen consecutive business days or for an aggregate period of more than thirty days in a calendar year for any purpose, including but not limited to vacation, travel, or retirement.

CO Rev Stat § 16-22-108

(5) During the initial registration process for a temporary resident, the local law enforcement agency with which the temporary resident is registering shall provide the temporary resident with the registration information specified in section 16-22-105. A temporary resident who is required to register pursuant to the provisions of section 16-22-103 shall, within five business days after arrival in Colorado, register with the local law enforcement agency of each jurisdiction in which the temporary resident resides.

Connecticut

CT Gen Stat § 54-253

(d) Any person not a resident of this state who is registered as a sexual offender under the laws of any other state and who travels in this state on a recurring basis for periods of less than five days shall notify the Commissioner of Emergency Services and Public Protection of such person’s temporary residence in this state and of a telephone number at which such person may be contacted.

For visits less than 5 days: Information will be registered for internal law enforcement use only and will not be included on the online registry.  For visits 5 days or longer: Full, in-person registration is required.  Information will be temporarily added to the online registry and removed when the visiting registrant leaves the state.

– Connecticut State Police Sex Offender Registry

Delaware

11 DE Code § 4120

(a) Unless otherwise indicated, the definitions set forth in § 4121(a) of this title shall apply to this section. In addition, when used in this section, the phrase “custodial institution” includes any Level IV or V facility operated by or for the Department of Correction, the Division of Youth Rehabilitative Services or the Delaware Psychiatric Center, or any like institution, and the phrase “temporary resident” shall include any person who is for more than 7 days or for more than an aggregate of 30 days in any 12-month period, employed or works in Delaware, or who is a full- or part-time student in Delaware. A student is any person who attends or enrolls in any public or private educational facility, including, but not limited to, colleges or universities.

(e) (2) Any person convicted of any offense specified in the laws of another state, the United States or any territory of the United States, or any foreign government, which is the same as, or equivalent to, any of the offenses set forth in § 4121(a)(4) of this title; or any person convicted of any federal or military offense enumerated in 42 U.S.C. § 16911(5)(A)(iii) and (iv), who is not a permanent or temporary resident of the State on the date of that person’s conviction, and who thereafter becomes a permanent or temporary resident of the State shall register as a sex offender within 3 business days of establishing permanent or temporary residency within the State. Any such person shall register at a designated Delaware State Police facility, and the Delaware State Police shall be deemed to be the registering agency.

Florida

FL Stat § 775.21

(2)(n) “Temporary residence” means a place where the person abides, lodges, or resides, including, but not limited to, vacation, business, or personal travel destinations in or out of this state, for a period of 3 or more days in the aggregate during any calendar year and which is not the person’s permanent address or, for a person whose permanent residence is not in this state, a place where the person is employed, practices a vocation, or is enrolled as a student for any period of time in this state.

Georgia

GA Code § 42-1-12

(e) Registration pursuant to this Code section shall be required by any individual who:

(7) Is a nonresident sexual offender who enters this state for the purpose of employment or any other reason for a period exceeding 14 consecutive days or for an aggregate period of time exceeding 30 days during any calendar year regardless of whether such sexual offender is required to register under federal law, military law, tribal law, or the laws of another state or territory;

Hawaii

HI Rev State § 846E-2

(g)  In addition to the requirement under subsection (a) to register with the attorney general and comply with the provisions of this chapter until a court relieves the covered offender of the registration requirements of this chapter, each covered offender shall also register in person with the chief of police where the covered offender resides or is present.  Registration under this subsection is for the purpose of providing the covered offender’s photograph, fingerprints, and registration information.  Registration under this subsection is required whenever the covered offender, whether or not a resident of this State, remains in this State for more than ten days or for an aggregate period exceeding thirty days in one calendar year.  Covered offenders required to register in person with the chief of police under this subsection shall register no later than three working days after the earliest of:

(1)  Arrival in this State;

Idaho

ID Code § 18-8307

(4)  (a) Within two (2) working days of coming into any county to establish residence, an offender shall register with the sheriff of the county. The offender thereafter shall register annually, unless the offender is designated as a violent sexual predator, in which case the offender shall register with the sheriff every three (3) months as provided in this section. If the offender intends to reside in another jurisdiction, the offender shall register in the other jurisdiction within two (2) days of moving to that jurisdiction and will not be removed from the sexual offender registry in Idaho until registration in another jurisdiction is complete.

Illinois

A sex offender visiting the State of Illinois for more than 3 days in a calendar year will be required to register with the local law enforcement jurisdiction where the sex offender is staying. This means cumulative days; it does not necessarily have to be 3 consecutive days.

– Illinois State Police

730 ILCS 150/3

(a) For purposes of this Article, the place of residence or temporary domicile is defined as any and all places where the sex offender resides for an aggregate period of time of 3 or more days during any calendar year. Any person required to register under this Article who lacks a fixed address or temporary domicile must notify, in person, the agency of jurisdiction of his or her last known address within 3 days after ceasing to have a fixed residence.

730 ILCS 150/3

(b) Any sex offender, as defined in Section 2 of this Act, or sexual predator, regardless of any initial, prior, or other registration, shall, within 3 days of beginning school, or establishing a residence, place of employment, or temporary domicile in any county, register in person as set forth in subsection (a) or (a-5).

Indiana

IC 11-8-8-7

(a) Subject to section 19 of this chapter, the following persons must register under this chapter:

(1) A sex or violent offender who resides in Indiana. A sex or violent offender resides in Indiana if either of the following applies:

(A) The sex or violent offender spends or intends to spend at least seven (7) days (including part of a day) in Indiana during a one hundred eighty (180) day period. 

(B) The sex or violent offender owns real property in Indiana and returns to Indiana at any time.

Iowa

Offenders who reside in Iowa, whether moving in or visiting, have (5) days to register with the Sheriff’s Office at the county where they have established residence.

– Iowa Department of Public Safety

IA Code § 692A.104

1. A sex offender shall appear in person to register with the sheriff of each county where the offender has a residence, maintains employment, or is in attendance as a student, within five business days of being required to register under section 692A.103 by providing all relevant information to the sheriff. A sheriff shall accept the registration of any person who is required to register in the county pursuant to the provisions of this chapter.

Kansas

K.S.A. 22-4905

Any offender required to register as provided in the Kansas offender registration act shall:

(a) Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, register in person with the registering law enforcement agency within three business days of coming into any county or location of jurisdiction in which the offender resides or intends to reside, maintains employment or intends to maintain employment, or attends school or intends to attend school.

Kentucky

KRS 17.510

(7) (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this subsection, if a person is required to register under federal law or the laws of another state or territory, or if the person has been convicted of an offense in a court of the United States, in a court martial of the United States Armed Forces, or under the laws of another state or territory that would require registration if committed in this Commonwealth, that person upon changing residence from the other state or territory of the United States to the Commonwealth or upon entering the Commonwealth for employment, to carry on a vocation, or as a student shall comply with the registration requirement of this section, including the requirements of subsection (4) of this section, and shall register within five (5) working days with the appropriate local probation and parole office in the county of residence, employment, vocation, or schooling. A person required to register under federal law or the laws of another state or territory shall be presumed to know of the duty to register in the Commonwealth. As used in this subsection, “employment” or “carry on a vocation” includes employment that is full-time or part-time for a period exceeding fourteen (14) days or for an aggregate period of time exceeding thirty (30) days during any calendar year, whether financially compensated, volunteered, or for the purpose of government or educational benefit. As used in this subsection, “student” means a person who is enrolled on a full-time or part-time basis, in any public or private educational institution, including any secondary school, trade or professional institution, or institution of higher education.

Louisiana

LA Rev Stat § 15:542.1.3

A. Any person who is convicted or adjudicated of an offense under the laws of another state, or military, territorial, foreign, tribal, or federal law for which R.S. 15:542 requires registration shall be subject to and shall comply with all of the registration requirements of this Chapter within three business days of establishing a residence in Louisiana and shall comply with all notification requirements required in R.S. 15:542.1 within twenty-one days of establishing a residence in Louisiana. Such person shall also notify the bureau within three business days of establishing residence in Louisiana and shall provide the bureau, within thirty days of establishing residence in Louisiana, certified copies of court records pertaining to the offense or offenses which require registration as a sex offender, including but not limited to the bill of information, indictment, court minutes, and final disposition.

LA Rev Stat § 15:541

(22) “Residence” means a dwelling where an offender regularly resides, regardless of the number of days or nights spent there. For those offenders who lack a fixed abode or dwelling, “residence” shall include the area or place where the offender habitually lives, including but not limited to a rural area with no address or a shelter.

Maine

Pre-2013 applies to a person sentenced prior to January 1, 2013.

Post-2013 applies to a person who commits criminal conduct and is sentenced on or after January 1, 2013.

In Maine, registrants must register with two separate entities: Local Law Enforcement and the Registry.

A registrant must notify local law enforcement within 24 hours of entering the state.

A registrant must verbally notify the registry within 5 days for Pre-2013 or 3 days for Post-2013, but do not have to fully register unless in the state for 14 consecutive days or more than 30 days in a calendar year.

– Department of Public Safety, Maine State Police

Pre-2013 34-A ME Rev Stat § 11223

A person sentenced at any time for a military, tribal or federal offense requiring registration pursuant to the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, also known as the Jacob Wetterling Act, Section 170101 of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, Public Law 103-322, as amended; or the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006, Public Law 109-248; or in a jurisdiction other than this State who is required under that jurisdiction to register pursuant to that jurisdiction’s sex offender registration statute or would have been required to register if the person had remained in the jurisdiction or, if not so required, who has been sentenced on or after January 1, 1982 for an offense that includes the essential elements of a sex offense or a sexually violent offense shall register as a 10-year registrant or lifetime registrant, whichever is applicable, within 5 days and shall notify the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction within 24 hours of establishing domicile or residence in this State. The person shall contact the bureau, which shall provide the person with the registration form and direct the person to take the form and a photograph of the person to the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction. The law enforcement agency shall supervise the completion of the form, take the person’s fingerprints and immediately forward the form, photograph and fingerprints to the bureau.

34-A ME Rev Stat § 11203

4-D. Residence.  “Residence” means that place or those places, other than a domicile, in which a person may spend time living, residing or dwelling. Proof that an offender has lived in the State for 14 days continuously or an aggregate of 30 days within a period of one year gives rise to a permissible inference under the Maine Rules of Evidence, Rule 303 that the person has established a residence for the purposes of registration requirements imposed by this chapter.  

Post-2013 34-A ME Rev Stat § 11283

A person who has been sentenced for a military, tribal or federal offense requiring registration pursuant to the federal Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006, Public Law 109-248, 42 United States Code, Chapter 151 or in a jurisdiction other than this State who is required under that jurisdiction to register pursuant to that jurisdiction’s sex offender registration statute or would have been required to register if the person had remained in the jurisdiction or, if not so required, who has been sentenced for an offense that includes the essential elements of a Tier I, Tier II or Tier III offense shall register as a Tier I registrant, a Tier II registrant or a Tier III registrant, whichever is applicable, within 3 days and shall notify the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction within 24 hours of establishing domicile or residence in this State. The person shall contact the bureau, which shall provide the person with the registration form and direct the person to take the form and a current photograph of the person to the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction. The law enforcement agency shall supervise the completion of the form, take the person’s fingerprints and immediately forward the form, photograph and fingerprints to the bureau.

34-A ME Rev Stat § 11273

12. Residence.  “Residence” means that place or those places, other than a domicile, in which a person may spend time living, residing or dwelling. Proof that an offender has lived in the State for 14 days continuously or an aggregate of 30 days within a period of one year gives rise to a permissible inference under the Maine Rules of Evidence, Rule 303 that the person has established a residence for the purposes of registration requirements imposed by this chapter. 

Maryland

MD. Crim Pro Code Ann. § 11-705

(b) A registrant shall register with the appropriate supervising authority in the State:

(5) if the registrant is not a resident, within 3 days after the registrant:

(i) begins employment in the State;

(ii) registers as a student in the State; or

(iii) enters the State as a transient.

Massachusetts

MGL c.6 § 178E

(g) A sex offender who moves into the commonwealth from another jurisdiction shall, within two days of moving into the commonwealth, register by mailing to the board on a form approved by the board and signed under the pains and penalties of perjury, the sex offender’s name, date of birth, home address or intended home address, any secondary addresses or intended secondary addresses, work address or intended work address and, if the sex offender is or intends to become a part-time or full-time employee of an institution of higher learning, the name and address of the institution, and, if the sex offender is or intends to become a part-time or full-time student of an institution of higher learning, the name and address of the institution. The board shall transmit the registration data to the police department in the municipality where such sex offender intends to live and work and, if the sex offender intends to work at or become a student at an institution of higher learning, to the police departments in the municipalities where the sex offender will work or attend such institution and shall transmit the same to the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Michigan

MI Comp L § 28.724

(6) All of the following shall register with the local law enforcement agency, sheriff’s department, or the department not more than 3 business days after becoming domiciled or temporarily residing, working, or being a student in this state:

(a) Subject to section 3(1), an individual convicted in another state or country on or after October 1, 1995 of a listed offense as defined before September 1, 1999.

(b) Subject to section 3(2), an individual convicted in another state or country of an offense added on September 1, 1999 to the definition of listed offenses.

(c) Subject to section 3(1), an individual convicted in another state or country of a listed offense before October 1, 1995 and, subject to section 3(2), an individual convicted in another state or country of an offense added on September 1, 1999 to the definition of listed offenses, who is convicted of any other felony on or after July 1, 2011.

(d) An individual required to be registered as a sex offender in another state or country regardless of when the conviction was entered.

Minnesota

MN Stat § 243.166

1. 1b. (b) A person also shall register under this section if:

(1) the person was charged with or petitioned for an offense in another state similar to an offense or involving similar circumstances to an offense described in paragraph (a), clause (1), (2), or (3), and convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for that offense or another offense arising out of the same set of circumstances;

(2) the person enters this state to reside, work, or attend school, or enters this state and remains for 14 days or longer or for an aggregate period of time exceeding 30 days during any calendar year; and

(3) ten years have not elapsed since the person was released from confinement or, if the person was not confined, since the person was convicted of or adjudicated delinquent for the offense that triggers registration, unless the person is subject to a longer registration period under the laws of another state in which the person has been convicted or adjudicated, or is subject to lifetime registration.

If a person described in this paragraph is subject to a longer registration period in another state or is subject to lifetime registration, the person shall register for that time period regardless of when the person was released from confinement, convicted, or adjudicated delinquent.

Mississippi

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-25

(3) For purposes of this chapter, a person is considered to be residing in this state if he maintains a permanent or temporary residence as defined in Section 45-33-23, including students, temporary employees and military personnel on assignment.

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-23

(i) “Temporary residence” is defined as any place where the person abides, lodges, or resides for a period of seven (7) or more consecutive days which is not the person’s permanent residence.

Missouri

MO Rev Stat § 589.400.

11. Any nonresident worker, including work as a volunteer or intern, or nonresident student shall register for the duration of such person’s employment, including participation as a volunteer or intern, or attendance at any school of higher education whether public or private, including any secondary school, trade school, professional school, or institution of higher education on a full-time or part-time basis in this state unless granted relief under section 589.401.  Any registered offender shall provide information regarding any place in which the offender is staying when away from his or her residence for seven or more days, including the period of time the offender is staying in such place.  Any registered offender from another state who has a temporary residence in this state and resides more than seven days in a twelve-month period shall register for the duration of such person’s temporary residency unless granted relief under section 589.401.

Montana

MT Code § 46-23-504

(1) Except as provided in 41-5-1513, a sexual or violent offender:

(c) shall register within 3 business days of entering a county of this state for the purpose of residing or setting up a temporary residence for 10 days or more or for an aggregate period exceeding 30 days in a calendar year;

Nebraska

An offender must register if he/she has a temporary address for 3 working days or more; working days is Monday-Friday not including weekends or Nebraska state holidays. An offender must also register if he/she has a habitual living location for 3 days or more.  If an offender is simply traveling through Nebraska that does not meet the 3 working day or 3 day requirement then no registration is required.

– Nebraska State Patrol

NE Code § 29-4001.01.

For purposes of the Sex Offender Registration Act:

(6) Temporary domicile means any place at which the person actually lives or stays for a period of at least three working days.

Nevada

NRS 179D.460

2. Except as otherwise provided in subsection 3, if the offender or sex offender resides or is present for 48 hours or more within:

(a) A county; or

(b) An incorporated city that does not have a city police department,

the offender or sex offender shall be deemed a resident offender or sex offender and shall register with the sheriff’s office of the county or, if the county or the city is within the jurisdiction of a metropolitan police department, the metropolitan police department, not later than 48 hours after arriving or establishing a residence within the county or the city.

New Hampshire

RSA 651-B:4

I. Any sexual offender or offender against children residing in this state shall report in person to the local law enforcement agency. The offender shall report in person as set forth in this section within 5 business days after the person’s release, or within 5 business days after the person’s date of establishment of residence, employment, or schooling in New Hampshire.

II. Any nonresident offender shall report in person to the local law enforcement agency having jurisdiction over the place of employment or school. In the event a nonresident offender required to register under this paragraph does not have a principal place of employment in this state, the offender shall register in person with the department in Concord.

RSA 651-B:1

XIII. Notwithstanding RSA 21:6-a, “residence” means a place where a person is living or temporarily staying for more than a total of 5 days during a one-month period, such as a shelter or structure that can be located by a street address, including, but not limited to, houses, apartment buildings, motels, hotels, homeless shelters, and recreational and other vehicles.

New Jersey

N.J.S.A. 2C:7-2

c. (3) A person moving to or returning to this State from another jurisdiction shall register with the chief law enforcement officer of the municipality in which the person will reside or, if the municipality does not have a local police force, the Superintendent of State Police within 120 days of the effective date of this act or 10 days of first residing in or returning to a municipality in this State, whichever is later;

New Mexico

You will need to register if you were convicted prior to July 1, 2013 and are going to be in the state of New Mexico for longer than ten (10) days. You will need to register within five (5) days if you were convicted after July 1, 2013.

– New Mexico Department of Public Safety

New York

NYS does not require registration for a short visit (less than 14 days) however, as a courtesy, it is suggested that the offender advises local law enforcement of their presence in the area. 

Living in NY for 14 consecutive days or 30 days over the course of a 12-month period could be considered residency and would be a deciding factor in referring a case to the New York State Board of Examiners of Sex Offenders to determine if the offender is required to register in NYS.

– New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services

North Carolina

NC Gen Stat § 14-208.7

(a) A person who is a State resident and who has a reportable conviction shall be required to maintain registration with the sheriff of the county where the person resides. If the person moves to North Carolina from outside this State, the person shall register within three business days of establishing residence in this State, or whenever the person has been present in the State for 15 days, whichever comes first.

North Dakota

N.D.C.C. § 12.1-32-15

1. i. “Temporarily domiciled” means staying or being physically present in this state for more than thirty days in a calendar year or at a location for longer than ten consecutive days, attending school for longer than ten days, or maintaining employment in the jurisdiction for longer than ten days, regardless of the state of the residence. 

2. The court shall impose, in addition to any penalty provided by law, a requirement that the individual register, within three days of coming into a county in which the individual resides, is homeless, or within the period identified in this section that the individual becomes temporarily domiciled. The individual must register with the chief of police of the city of the individual’s place of residence, or the sheriff of the county if the individual resides in an area other than a city. A homeless individual shall register every three days with the sheriff or chief of police of the jurisdiction in which the individual is physically present.

Ohio

An offender who committed his or her offense before Jan. 1, 2008, must register within five days of coming into a county where he or she is staying for five or more days. If this type of offender has worked in a county for 14 consecutive days or 30 days in a calendar year, he or she must register with the sheriff.

An offender who committed his or her offenses after Jan. 1, 2008, must register within three days of being in a county for three or more days, or for work purposes, if he or she has been in the county for 14 or more total (not necessarily consecutive) days in a calendar year.

An offender in either category (that is, regardless of date of offense) must register with the local sheriff immediately upon entering a county in which he or she attends school or an institution of higher education.

– Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation

ORC § 2950.04

(A)(2)(a) The offender shall register personally with the sheriff, or the sheriff’s designee, of the county within three days of the offender’s coming into a county in which the offender resides or temporarily is domiciled for more than three days.

Oklahoma

57 OK Stat § 57-583

A. Any person who becomes subject to the provisions of the Sex Offenders Registration Act on or after November 1, 1989, shall register, in person, as follows:

2. With the local law enforcement authority having jurisdiction in the area where the person resides or intends to reside for seven (7) consecutive days or fourteen (14) days in a sixty-day period, or longer, calculated beginning with the first day.  The registration is required within three (3) days after entering the jurisdiction of the law enforcement authority; and

3. With the Department of Corrections and the local law enforcement authority no less than three (3) business days prior to abandoning or moving from the address of the previous registration, or within three (3) business days of changing or terminating employment, or changing enrollment status as a student.

H. Any person who resides in another state and who has been convicted of an offense or received a deferred judgment for an offense in this state, or in another jurisdiction, which offense if committed or attempted in this state would have been punishable as one or more of the offenses listed in Section 582 of this title, and who is the spouse of a person living in this state shall be registered as follows:

1. With the Department of Corrections when the person enters and intends to be in the state for any purpose for five (5) consecutive days or longer, calculated beginning with the first day or an aggregate period of five (5) days or longer in a calendar year.  Such registration is required within two (2) days after entering the state; and

2. With the local law enforcement authority having jurisdiction in the area where the person intends to reside or to stay within this state for two (2) consecutive days or longer, calculated beginning with the first day.  The registration is required with local law enforcement within two (2) days after entering the jurisdiction of the law enforcement authority.

Oregon

Visitors to Oregon are not required to register.

Pennsylvania

Post 12/20/12 applies to those whose offense was committed on or after December 20, 2012.

Pre 12/20/12 applies to those whose offense was committed before December 20, 2012.

Post 12/20/12 42 Pa C.S. § 9799.19

(1) An individual subject to registration under section 9799.13(7), (7.1) or (7.2) shall appear in person at an approved registration site to provide the information set forth in section 9799.16(b) to the Pennsylvania State Police within three business days of establishing residence, commencing employment or commencing enrollment as a student within this Commonwealth.

Post 12/20/12 42 Pa C.S. § 9799.12

“Residence.” A location where an individual resides or is domiciled or intends to be domiciled for 30 consecutive days or more during a calendar year. The term includes a residence which is mobile, including a houseboat, mobile home, trailer or recreational vehicle.

Pre 12/20/12 42 Pa C.S. § 9799.56

(b) (4) An individual who has a residence, is employed or is a student in this Commonwealth and who has been convicted of or sentenced by a court or court martialed for a sexually violent offense or a similar offense under the laws of the United States or one of its territories or possessions, another state, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico or a foreign nation, or who was required to register under a sexual offender statute in the jurisdiction where convicted, sentenced or court martialed, shall register at an approved registration site within three business days of the individual’s arrival in this Commonwealth.

Pre 12/20/12 42 Pa C.S. § 9799.53

“Residence.” With respect to an individual required to register under this subchapter, any of the following:

(1) A location where an individual resides or is domiciled or intends to be domiciled for 30 consecutive days or more during a calendar year.

(2) In the case of an individual who fails to establish a residence as specified in paragraph (1), a temporary habitat or other temporary place of abode or dwelling, including, but not limited to, a homeless shelter or park, where the individual is lodged.

Rhode Island

RI Gen L § 11-37.1-4

(g) All persons required to register under this chapter who are moving their residence to Rhode Island from another jurisdiction shall perform their initial registration by appearing in person at the local law enforcement agency in the city or town in which the person intends to reside within twenty-four (24) hours of their arrival in Rhode Island.

South Carolina

SC Code § 23-3-460

(D) If a person required to register pursuant to this article changes his permanent or temporary address into another county in South Carolina, the person must register with the county sheriff in the new county within three business days of establishing the new residence. The person also must provide written notice within three business days of the change of address in the previous county to the sheriff with whom the person last registered. For purposes of this subsection, “temporary address” or “residence” means the location of the individual’s home or other place where the person habitually lives or resides, or where the person lives or resides for a period of ten or more consecutive days. For purposes of this subsection, “habitually lives or resides” means locations at which the person lives with some regularity.

(G) A person required to register pursuant to this article who moves to South Carolina from another state establishes residence, acquires real property, is employed in, or attends, is enrolled, volunteers, interns, is employed by, or carries on a vocation at a public or private school, including, but not limited to, a kindergarten, elementary school, middle school or junior high, high school, secondary school, adult education school, college or university, and a vocational, technical, or occupational school in South Carolina, and is not under the jurisdiction of the Department of Corrections, the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services, the Department of Juvenile Justice, or the Juvenile Parole Board at the time of moving to South Carolina must register within three business days of establishing residence, acquiring real property, gaining employment, attending or enrolling, volunteering or interning, being employed by, or carrying on a vocation at a public or private school in this State.

South Dakota

SDCL § 22-24B-2

The sex offender shall register within three business days of coming into any county to reside, temporarily domicile, attend school, attend postsecondary education classes, or work. Registration shall be with the chief of police of the municipality or the sheriff of the county in which the sex offender resides, temporarily domiciles, attends school, attends postsecondary education classes, or works. The sex offender shall notify the chief of police or sheriff if there is a change where the sex offender resides, attends school, or works.

Tennessee

TN Code § 40-39-203

(a) (1) Within forty-eight (48) hours of establishing or changing a primary or secondary residence, establishing a physical presence at a particular location, becoming employed or practicing a vocation or becoming a student in this state, the offender shall register or report in person, as required by this part. Likewise, within forty-eight (48) hours of release on probation or any alternative to incarceration, excluding parole, the offender shall register or report in person, as required by this part.

TN Code § 40-39-202

(18) “Secondary residence” means a place where the person abides, lodges, resides or establishes any other living accommodations in this state for a period of fourteen (14) or more days in the aggregate during any calendar year and that is not the person’s primary residence; for a person whose primary residence is not in this state, a place where the person is employed, practices a vocation or is enrolled as a student for a period of fourteen (14) or more days in the aggregate during any calendar year; or a place where the person routinely abides, lodges or resides for a period of four (4) or more consecutive or nonconsecutive days in any month and that is not the person’s primary residence, including any out-of-state address;

(32) “Within forty-eight (48) hours” means a continuous forty-eight-hour period, not including Saturdays, Sundays or federal or state holidays.

Texas

TX Code Crim Pro Art. 62.051.

(a)  A person who has a reportable conviction or adjudication or who is required to register as a condition of parole, release to mandatory supervision, or community supervision shall register or, if the person is a person for whom registration is completed under this chapter, verify registration as provided by Subsection (f), with the local law enforcement authority in any municipality where the person resides or intends to reside for more than seven days.  If the person does not reside or intend to reside in a municipality, the person shall register or verify registration in any county where the person resides or intends to reside for more than seven days.  The person shall satisfy the requirements of this subsection not later than the later of:

(1)  the seventh day after the person’s arrival in the municipality or county;

Utah

UT Code § 77-41-102

(17) “Sex offender” means any individual:

(c)(i) (A) who is required to register as a sex offender in any other jurisdiction of original conviction;

(B) who is required to register as a sex offender by any state, federal, or military court; or

(C) who would be required to register as a sex offender if residing in the jurisdiction of the original conviction regardless of the date of the conviction or any previous registration requirements; and

(ii) who, in any 12-month period, is in the state for a total of 10 or more days, regardless of whether or not the offender intends to permanently reside in this state;

UT Code § 77-41-105

(1) (a) An offender who enters this state from another jurisdiction is required to register under Subsection (3) and Subsection 77-41-102(9) or (17).

(b) The offender shall register with the department within 10 days after the day on which the offender enters the state, regardless of the offender’s length of stay.

Vermont

Any sex offender who intends to visit Vermont for 10 consecutive days or 30 days in a calendar year must register with the VCIC within 10 days of arrival. The registrant will complete a Notification of Requirement to Register form and a Sex Offender Registry Registration form. Both forms must be signed and returned to the VCIC. These forms may be obtained from the VCIC either in person, through the mail, or on the Department’s web site.

– Vermont Department of Public Safety

Virginia

VA Code § 9.1-905

B. Nonresident offenders entering the Commonwealth for an extended visit, for employment, to carry on a vocation, or as a student attending school who are required to register in their state of residence or who would be required to register if a resident of the Commonwealth shall, within three days of entering the Commonwealth for an extended visit, accepting employment or enrolling in school in the Commonwealth, be required to register and reregister in person with the local law-enforcement agency.

D. For purposes of this section:

“Extended visit” means a period of visitation for any purpose in the Commonwealth of 30 days or more.

Washington

RCW § 9A.44.130

(4)(a)(iv) Sex offenders and kidnapping offenders who are visiting Washington state and intend to reside or be present in the state for ten days or more shall register his or her temporary address or where he or she plans to stay with the county sheriff of each county where the offender will be staying within three business days of arrival. Registration for temporary residents shall include the information required by subsection (2)(a) of this section, except the photograph and fingerprints.

West Virginia

WV Code § 15-12-9

(b) Any person:

(1) Who resides in another state or federal or military jurisdiction;

(2) Who is employed, carries on a vocation, is a student in this state, is a visitor to this state for a period of more than fifteen continuous days or owns or leases habitable real property in this state that he or she regularly visits; and

(3) Who is required by the state, federal or military jurisdiction in which he or she resides to register in that state, federal or military jurisdiction as a sex offender, or has been convicted of a violation in that state, federal or military jurisdiction that is similar to a violation in this article requiring registration as a sex offender in this state, shall register in this state and otherwise comply with the provisions of this article.

Wisconsin

WI Stat § 301.45

(2) (e) 2m. If the person is registered as a sex offender in another state or is registered as a sex offender with the federal bureau of investigation under 42 USC 14072, within 10 days after the person enters this state to take up residence or begin school, employment or his or her vocation.

Wyoming

The offender must register, in person, within three business days of changing residence. This includes temporary changes (vacation, etc) that are longer than three business days in duration.

– Wyoming Division of Criminal Investigation

Washington DC

Offenders are allowed to visit DC for less than 30 days without having to register with DC. Anything over 30 days requires notification to the DC SOR.

All convicted sex offenders coming to DC for employment, school or extended visitations, should make contact with the DC SOR. This does not mean that they will be required to register however it gives the registry staff the ability to assess the case, obtain the required documentation and provide it to the attorneys for a registration determination.

– DC Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency

Guam

Title 9 GCA § 89.03

(d) (2) Initial Registration, In General. All sex offenders shall initially register:

(D) no later than three (3) working days after arrival on Guam;

Northern Mariana Islands

6 CMC §1367

(b) For any other jurisdiction, foreign, federal, and military convictions, a sex offender must appear in person at the Department of Public Safety within 3 business days of establishing a residence, commencing employment or becoming a student in the Commonwealth.

Puerto Rico

L.P.R.A. § 536c.

In the case of a person of another country who has been convicted of a sex offense or child abuse by a federal, state or military court, or a court of his/her country, and resides in Puerto Rico, or who is in Puerto Rico by reasons of work or study, even if such offender does not intend to establish a residence in Puerto Rico, he/she shall be required to register and shall carry out his/her registration not later than three (3) days after his/her arrival to Puerto Rico.

U.S. Virgin Islands

14 V.I.C. § 1724

(a) (4) A person who is convicted in any state, territory or Indian tribe of the United States, any foreign jurisdiction or in any federal or military court of one of the covered offenses or an offense similar to one of the covered offenses who moves to or returns to the United States Virgin Islands from another jurisdiction for the purpose of establishing residency, employment, or becoming a student or who did not intend to but who eventually establishes residency, obtains employment or becomes a student within the jurisdiction of this territory shall register within three (3) business days of moving to or returning to the Territory.

14 V.I.C. § 1721

(j) The terms “reside” and “resides” mean, with respect to an individual, the location of the individual’s home or other place where the individual habitually lives or sleeps for more than 30 days per year. Moreover, all visitors and individuals who are required to register pursuant to this chapter and who will be present in the territory for less than 30 days in any given year, must contact the Department of Justice in order to notify the Department of his or her presence in the territory as well as all arrival and departure information.

Sex Offender Registry Removal

Some states offer the possibility for registrants to be removed from the registry after meeting certain requirements.  Visit the Collateral Consequences Resource Center for a state by state comparison of relief from sex offender registration obligations.

If your state offers a path off the registry, search our directory for a lawyer with experience in registry removal applications.