Restrictions for Mississippi

Review Supervised Release restrictions in each of the federal districts and the Sex Offender Registry requirements for the state of Mississippi

Mississippi Federal Districts:

Northern and Southern

Below you will find information on standard conditions of supervision and travel restrictions, as well as sex offender registry requirements. 

Always follow the conditions and restrictions given to you by your U.S. Probation Officer.

Mississippi district map

Select your district below:

Northern District

Southern District

Northern District of Mississippi

Standard Conditions of Supervision

  1. You must report to the probation office in the federal judicial district where you are authorized to reside within 72 hours of your release from imprisonment, unless the probation officer instructs you to report to a different probation office or within a different time frame.
  2. After initially reporting to the probation office, you will receive instructions from the court or the probation officer about how and when you must report to the probation officer, and you must report to the probation officer as instructed.
  3. You must not knowingly leave the federal judicial district where you are authorized to reside without first getting permission from the court or the probation officer.
  4. You must answer truthfully the questions asked by your probation officer.
  5. You must live at a place approved by the probation officer. if you plan to change where you live or anything about your living arrangements (such as the people you live with), you must notify the probation officer at least 10 days before the change. If notifying the probation officer in advance is not possible due to unanticipated circumstances, you must notify the probation officer within 72 hours of becoming aware of a change or expected change.
  6. You must allow the probation officer to visit you at any time at your home or elsewhere, and you must permit the probation officer to take any items prohibited by the conditions of your supervision that he or she observes in plain view.
  7. You must work full time (at least 30 hours per week) at a lawful type of employment, unless the probation officer excuses you from doing so. If you do not have full-time employment you must try to find full-time employment, unless the probation officer excuses you from doing so. If you plan to change where you work or anything about your work (such as your position or your job responsibilities), you must notify the probation officer at least 10 days before the change. If notifying the probation officer at least 10 days in advance is not possible due to unanticipated circumstances, you must notify the probation officer within 72 hours of becoming aware of a change or expected change.
  8. You must not communicate or interact with someone you know is engaged in criminal activity. If you know someone has been convicted of a felony, you must not knowingly communicate or interact with that person without first getting the permission of the probation officer.
  9. If you are arrested or questioned by a law enforcement officer, you must notify the probation officer within 72 hours.
  10. You must not own, possess, or have access to a firearm, ammunition, destructive device, or dangerous weapon (i.e., anything that was designed, or was modified for, the specific purpose of causing bodily injury or death to another person such as nunchakus or triers).
  11. You must not act or make any agreement with a law enforcement agency to act as a confidential human source or informant without first getting the permission of the court.
  12. If the probation officer determines that you pose a risk to another person (including an organization), the probation officer may require you to notify the person about the risk and you must comply with that instruction. The probation officer may contact the person and confirm that you have notified the person about the risk.
  13. You must follow the instructions of the probation officer related to the conditions of supervision.

Travel Restrictions

The Northern District of Mississippi is comprised of 37 counties. You are allowed to travel freely within these 37 counties. Unless you are given permission in advance by the judge in your case, any request of travel outside of these 37 counties must be approved in advance by your U.S. Probation Officer.

Failure to do so may result in a violation of your supervision.

For more information visit the links below:

Southern District of Mississippi

Standard Conditions of Supervision

These are the standard conditions of supervision or probation the Court must impose.
This does not include special conditions the court may impose.
  1. You must report to the probation office in the federal judicial district where you are authorized to reside within 72 hours of your release from imprisonment, unless the probation officer instructs you to report to a different probation office or within a different time frame.
  2. After initially reporting to the probation office, you will receive instructions from the court or the probation officer about how and when you must report to the probation officer, and you must report to the probation officer as instructed.
  3. You must not knowingly leave the federal judicial district where you are authorized to reside without first getting permission from the court or the probation officer.
  4. You must answer truthfully the questions asked by your probation officer.
  5. You must live at a place approved by the probation officer. If you plan to change where you live or anything about your living arrangements (such as the people you live with), you must notify the probation officer at least 10 days before the change. If notifying the probation officer in advance is not possible due to unanticipated circumstances, you must notify the probation officer within 72 hours of becoming aware of a change or expected change.
  6. You must allow the probation officer to visit you at any time at your home or elsewhere, and you must permit the probation officer to take any items prohibited by the conditions of your supervision that he or she observes in plain view.
  7. You must work full time (at least 30 hours per week) at a lawful type of employment, unless the probation officer excuses you from doing so. If you do not have full-time employment you must try to find full-time employment, unless the probation officer excuses you from doing so. If you plan to change where you work or anything about your work (such as your position or your job responsibilities), you must notify the probation officer at least 10 days before the change. If notifying the probation officer at least 10 days in advance is not possible due to unanticipated circumstances, you must notify the probation officer within 72 hours of becoming aware of a change or expected change.
  8. You must not communicate or interact with someone you know is engaged in criminal activity. If you know someone has been convicted of a felony, you must not knowingly communicate or interact with that person without first getting the permission of the probation officer.
  9. If you are arrested or questioned by a law enforcement officer, you must notify the probation officer within 72 hours.
  10. You must not own, possess, or have access to a firearm, ammunition, destructive device, or dangerous weapon (i.e., anything that was designed, or was modified for, the specific purpose of causing bodily injury or death to another person such as nunchakus or tasers).
  11. You must not act or make any agreement with a law enforcement agency to act as a confidential human source or informant without first getting the permission of the court.
  12. If the probation officer determines that you pose a risk to another person (including an organization), the probation officer may require you to notify the person about the risk and you must comply with that instruction. The probation officer may contact the person and confirm that you have notified the person about the risk.
  13. You must follow the instructions of the probation officer related to the conditions of supervision.

Travel Restrictions

The Southern District of Mississippi is comprised of 45 counties. You are allowed to travel freely within these 45 counties. Unless you are given permission in advance by the judge in your case, any requests to travel outside of these 45 counties must be submitted two (2) weeks prior to planned travel and approved by your U.S. Probation Officer.

Failure to do so may result in a violation of your supervision.

For more information visit the links below:

Mississippi Sex Offender Registry Requirements

What is the Sex Offender Registry?

Every state and U.S. territory requires those convicted of sex offenses to be added to a registry to be monitored and tracked after their release back into the community.  Information about the offender is collected and shared with local and federal authorities, as well as the general public.  Requirements and restrictions are often placed on registered sex offenders.  That registration process is unique in each state and U.S. territory.

Reentry (2)

What is SORNA?

The Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA) was passed in 2006 as part of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act to provide federal standards for jurisdictions to follow.  SORNA calls for states and U.S. territories to meet minimum requirements for sex offender registration and notification.

Why Are the Requirements for Sex Offender Registration Different Everywhere?

While SORNA’s guidelines streamlined registration and notification requirements across the country, these requirements are far from uniform.  Each jurisdiction determines the details of their own registration process.  This leaves a patchwork of rules for sex offenders that vary widely depending on where a registrant lives or works.

Where PIN Comes In

Probation Information Network developed a list of questions regarding the sex offender registration requirements across the country.  These are questions that might concern the public, victims and their advocates, or those who are facing registration or are currently registered and their loved ones.  We then searched the statutes or code of each jurisdiction for the laws surrounding sex offender registration and notification.  Where necessary, we consulted with the law enforcement agency in charge of the jurisdiction’s registry to provide clear and concise answers to the following questions:

 

    • What is the duration of registration?

How long must a sex offender remain on the registry?  The length of time a sex offender must comply with registration requirements varies widely depending on the jurisdiction where the registrant lives, and the level of the offense committed.  All but 2 jurisdictions offer a path for eventual removal from the registry for at least some of their registrants.

 

    • Must the immediate community be notified directly, either by the offender or law enforcement?

Every jurisdiction has passive community notification in the form of a public sex offender registry website.  Concerned citizens are free to search the website and can sign up for email notifications if a sex offender moves into their neighborhood.  Some jurisdictions go even further and require active notification, where either law enforcement or the offender themselves is required to directly notify the immediate community that a sex offender is in the area.  This can take many forms, including electronic, mail, or in-person notification, publication in local newspapers, and community meetings.

 

    • What are the residence distance restrictions?

Are there any restrictions on where a registered sex offender can live?  Some jurisdictions restrict registrants from living within a measured distance of certain places.  This restriction could be for all registrants, or only for higher-level offenders or those under supervision.  Some jurisdictions do not have a state-wide restriction but do allow local jurisdictions to enact their own.

 

    • What are the employment distance restrictions?

Registered sex offenders are usually restricted from certain types of employment, and from working at establishments that specifically cater to minors.  Some jurisdictions go even further and restrict registrants from working within a measured distance of certain places.

 

    • Is an employer’s information included on the public registry?

Returning citizens of every type need to find employment upon reentry, and sex offenders are no exception.  Some jurisdictions include registrants’ employment information on the public registry website.  This could be the employer’s address or in some cases the name of the employer.

 

    • Are online identifiers included on the public registry?

Some jurisdictions require registered sex offenders to report any identifiers they use online, such as email addresses and social media user names.  In some jurisdictions that information is included on the public registry website, separate from the registrant’s profile, in a feature that allows the pubic to search by specific identifiers.

 

    • Is a state-issued ID required to be labeled?

Some jurisdictions require a state-issued ID, such as a driver’s license, to be labeled to identify the holder as a registered sex offender.  This label could be the words “Sex Offender” printed on the ID in a prominent place or a more subtle designation known to law enforcement.

 

    • What is the cost of registration?

Is there a fee to register as a sex offender?  Some jurisdictions pass on some of their administrative costs to the registrants.  This could be a one-time fee paid only upon initial registration, or an ongoing fee paid annually or quarterly.  Some jurisdictions charge a fee every time a registrant updates their information.

 

    • How long can a registrant be in the state for work or education before registration is required?

Does a sex offender have to register if they work or go to school in a different state?  It depends on the state, and how long the registrant will be there.  Some jurisdictions require registrants to notify authorities immediately, while others allow limited stays without requiring registration.  Registrants currently under supervision usually need permission from their Parole or Probation Officer before traveling and should always consult their supervising officer.

 

    • How long can a registrant visit the state before registration is required?

Can a registered sex offender go on vacation?  Does a sex offender have to register if they visit a different state?  It depends on the state, and how long the registrant will be there.  Some jurisdictions require registrants to notify authorities immediately, while others allow limited stays without requiring registration.  Registrants currently under supervision usually need permission from their Parole or Probation Officer before traveling and should always consult their supervising officer.

 

The answers provided are taken directly from the laws found on the state or territory’s legislative website or, where necessary, from the website of the law enforcement agency in charge of the jurisdiction’s registry.  In some cases, we contacted state or territory officials for clarification and have directly quoted those conversations.

Disclaimer

While we stand by our research, it is for informational purposes only.  It should not be considered legal advice and, while we strive to provide accurate and up to date information, it is not guaranteed to be complete or correct.  We provide links to each jurisdiction’s legislative and law enforcement websites and maintain a directory of lawyers who specialize in sex offender registration laws.  For those currently under supervision, consult with your Parole or Probation Officer for guidance.

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-47

(2) A person required to register for a registrable sex offense under Section 45-33-25 may petition the circuit court of the sentencing jurisdiction, or for a person whose duty to register arose in another jurisdiction, the county in which the registrant resides, to be relieved of that duty under the following conditions:

(a) The offender has maintained his registration in Mississippi for the required minimum registration from the most recent date of occurrence of at least one (1) of the following: release from prison, placement on parole, supervised release or probation or as determined by the offender's tier classification. Incarceration for any offense will restart the minimum registration requirement. Registration in any other jurisdiction does not reduce the minimum time requirement for maintaining registration in Mississippi.

 

(b) (i) Tier One requires registration for a minimum of fifteen (15) years in this state and includes any of the following listed registrable sex offenses:

 

(c) (i) Tier Two requires registration for a minimum of twenty-five (25) years in this state and includes any of the following listed registrable sex offenses:

 

(d) Tier Three requires lifetime registration, the registrant not being eligible to be relieved of the duty to register except as otherwise provided in this section, and includes any of the following listed registrable sex offenses:

(e) An offender who has two (2) separate convictions for any of the registrable offenses described in Section 45-33-23 is subject to lifetime registration and shall not be eligible to petition to be relieved of the duty to register if at least one (1) of the convictions was entered on or after July 1, 1995.

 

(f) An offender, twenty-one (21) years of age or older, who is convicted of any sex offense where the victim was fourteen (14) years of age or younger shall be subject to lifetime registration and shall not be relieved of the duty to register.

 

(g) A first-time offender fourteen (14) years of age or older adjudicated delinquent in a youth court for a registrable offense of rape pursuant to Section 96-3-65 or a registrable offense of sexual battery pursuant to Section 97-3-95 is subject to lifetime registration, but shall be eligible to petition to be relieved of the duty to register after twenty-five (25) years of registration.

 

(h) Registration following arrest or arraignment for failure to register is not a defense and does not relieve the sex offender of criminal liability for failure to register.

 

(i) The department shall continue to list in the registry the name and registration information of all registrants who no longer work, reside or attend school in this state even after the registrant moves to another jurisdiction and registers in the new jurisdiction as required by law. The registry shall note that the registrant moved out of state.

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-36

(3) From and after July 1, 2015, local jurisdictions receiving notification and that have the ability may notify residents when a sex offender begins residing, lodges, becomes employed, volunteers or attends school or intends to reside, lodge, work, attend school or volunteer in the area by using a website, social media, print media, e-mail or may provide a link to the Department of Public Safety website.

 

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-59

(1) Any person convicted of a sex offense who is employed in any position, or who contracts with a person to provide personal services, where the employment position or personal services contract will bring the person into close regular contact with children shall notify in writing the employer or the person with whom the person has contracted of his sex offender status.

 

(2) This section applies to all registered sex offenders regardless of the date of conviction.

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-25

(4) (a) A person required to register under this chapter shall not reside within three thousand (3,000) feet of the real property comprising a public or nonpublic elementary or secondary school, a child care facility, a residential child-caring agency, a children's group care home or any playground, ballpark or other recreational facility utilized by persons under the age of eighteen (18) years.

 

(b) A person residing within three thousand (3,000) feet of the real property comprising a public or nonpublic elementary or secondary school or a child care facility does not commit a violation of this subsection if any of the following apply:

(i) The person is serving a sentence at a jail, prison, juvenile facility or other correctional institution or facility.

(ii) The person is subject to an order of commitment under Title 41, Mississippi Code of 1972.

(iii) The person established the subject residence before July 1, 2006.

(iv) The school or child care facility is established within three thousand (3,000) feet of the person's residence subsequent to the date the person established residency.

(v) The person established the subject residence between July 1, 2006, and January 1, 2014, in a location at least one thousand five hundred (1,500) feet from the school or child care facility.

(vi) The person is a minor or a ward under a guardianship.

 

(c) A person residing within three thousand (3,000) feet of the real property comprising a residential child-caring agency, a children's group care home or any playground, ballpark or other recreational facility utilized by persons under the age of eighteen (18) years does not commit a violation of this subsection if any of the following apply:

(i) The person established the subject residence before July 1, 2008.

(ii) The residential child-caring agency, children's group care home, playground, ballpark or other recreational facility utilized by persons under the age of eighteen (18) years is established within three thousand (3,000) feet of the person's residence subsequent to the date the person established residency.

(iii) The person established the subject residence between July 1, 2008, and January 1, 2014, in a location at least one thousand five hundred (1,500) feet from the residential child-caring agency, children's group care home, playground, ballpark or other recreational facility utilized by persons under the age of eighteen (18) years.

(iv) Any of the conditions described in subsection (4)(b)(i), (ii) or (vi) exist.

None.

Yes.

No.

 

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-49

(4) (b) (iii) The public website shall not display the identity of a victim of an offense that requires registration under this chapter or the registered sex offender's social security number, travel or immigration document numbers, Internet identifiers, telephone numbers, or any arrests not resulting in conviction.

Yes.

 

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-35-3

(2) The new, renewal or duplicate identification card of a person required to register as a sex offender pursuant to Section 45-33-25 shall bear a designation identifying the cardholder as a sex offender.

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-57

(2) The Department of Public Safety may adopt regulations to establish fees to be charged to registrants for registration, reregistration, and verification or change of address.

 

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-31

(1) (a) Registrants who are in compliance with a program of electronic monitoring under this chapter are required to reregister annually.

 

(b) All other registrants are required to personally appear at a Department of Public Safety Driver's License Station to reregister every ninety (90) days.

 

Offenders are required to pay $11.00 each time they register, which is currently done every three (3) months.

            – Mississippi Department of Public Safety, Driver Service Bureau

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-25

(3) For purposes of this chapter, a person is considered to be residing in this state if he maintains a permanent or temporary residence as defined in Section 45-33-23, including students, temporary employees and military personnel on assignment.

 

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-23

(i) "Temporary residence" is defined as any place where the person abides, lodges, or resides for a period of seven (7) or more consecutive days which is not the person's permanent residence.

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-25

(3) For purposes of this chapter, a person is considered to be residing in this state if he maintains a permanent or temporary residence as defined in Section 45-33-23, including students, temporary employees and military personnel on assignment.

 

Miss. Code Ann. § 45-33-23

(i) "Temporary residence" is defined as any place where the person abides, lodges, or resides for a period of seven (7) or more consecutive days which is not the person's permanent residence.